Garden Trends which you can Incorporate into Your Garden for 2019

As the clocks Spring forward and catapult us right into more light and hopefully, more warmth, it is good to know what is on trend in the world of gardening for 2019. A word of caution though: while it is great to be inspired by current gardening trends, do bear in mind that trends come and go and are not always based on sound horticultural advice, or indeed are right for your gardening space. Here are five garden trends for 2019 which you can incorporate into every garden.

Wildflower Meadows

The trend for planting wildflower meadows is set to continue this year perhaps informed by the concern over declining bee populations and greater awareness of supporting wildlife in general.

You don’t need to have a large garden to give over space to a whole wildflower meadow, you can simply give a corner of your garden over to it. Annual and perennial wildflowers will attract all manner of insects from April to November time, with the added bonus of being very low maintenance.

Drought Resistant Planting

Given the extreme hot, dry weather of Summer 2018 and the hose-pipe ban enforced in many areas, gardening for a changing climate is set to be a key trend for this year. 

Lots of Meditereanean plants like Rosemary, Lavender, Thyme or Sage, which are used to a hot, dry climate do well in a UK Summertime as long as they have free-draining soil. Their deep root systems mean that once established, they can survive without water. These herbs are all adapted to survive without frequent watering through leaves which might be either hairy or narrow needle-like leaves.

The Rosemary plant has narrow, needle-like leaves.

Living Walls

Living walls became popular last year and it is a trend that can be easily incorporated into the smallest of spaces. By thinking about the verticals in your garden, you can turn the sides of garages, sheds, fences and walls into pretty and productive growing spaces for flowers, herbs and even salad crops.

Do your research first though as living walls come in all sorts of shapes, sizes and materials. If you can afford it, you can also get ones which have self-watering units.

Image from Gardeners’ World Live

Grow Your Own Food

Whether it’s fear of Brexit looming; the increase in popularity of vegan and plant-based diets or the desire to be more sustainable but Twitter is full of stories of people talking about growing their own food this year.

You don’t need to have a large garden to grow your own fruit, veg, salad or herbs, this trend can easily be adopted by those with small or tiny urban spaces. Growing veg or salads in pots, planting small patio fruits or adding herbs to vertical planting schemes means that gardeners are embracing the drive to become more self-sufficient.

Go Big, Go Tropical

The lush, green, tropical look is set to get even bigger this year perhaps influenced by Wayne Amiel’s fabulous London garden which won the Judges’ Choice in Gardeners’ World Garden of the Year competition.

Big, dramatic plants will bring a wow factor to your garden and there are plenty of hardy palms and cordylines which can bring a jungle-like look to your garden. Other plants like bananas will need protecting during the Winter so it’s better to grow them in pots so you can bring them into a more protected spot for Winter.

Wayne Amiel Gardeners’ World magazine Gardens of the Year Competition 2018 Photographer: Sarah Cuttle

Which garden new trends will you be trying to incorporate into your garden this year?

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